Truck Tech

 

 

Hey Roger,

Well, I just had my truck out at Hollister Hills (northern California - http://www.hollisterhills.com/) this last weekend and man, It did great!Especially for being mostly stock except for 31ís.I did have one concern though. When I would hit a bump at any speed with the wheels sharply turned I would get a sound that almost sounded like metal twisting. It wasnít really a clunking noise but more of metal on metal or twisting. Not sure what it is but if anyone has encountered this same problem, please throw in your two cents.

Thanks, James.

Hi James;

The source of that noise is the steering stops on the front end.You can either apply some grease to them or replace the plastic end caps with parts from the dealer.Its a very common ďproblemĒ on the IFS Toyota trucks (Ď86-Ď95 models).For more information on this problem, see the following web page:

http://www.4x4wire.com/toyota/maintenance/front_end/lube/

        Roger

 

(a reply from James)

Hi Roger;

Well, I checked and the plastic caps are there, only theyíre worn through to the metal. I also looked for the zerk fitting shown on the photo on the above page and I didnít find it on my truck. In its place there is a regular bolt filling that hole.Is the fitting a modification that you did Roger?If so could you give some information?

Thanks, James.

Hi James;

There are no grease fittings for the steering stops.

You have 3 choices for this common problem:

1.†† Do nothing and live with the noise, itís not really hurting anything (besides your ear drums:).

2.†† Buy new caps from Toyota and replace every year or so (the stops cost about $5.00/ea. from Toyota).

3.†† Put a blob of grease on your finger and smear it over the end of the stop and the place on the

steering knuckle where it hits. Repeat every oil change or when it starts making noise again.

        Roger

 

 

Hi Roger;

How wide are rear leaf springs for an 89-95 Toyota Pickup 4WD?Are they 2.3 inches wide? I was under the impression that they were, but I am not entirely sure.Thanks, Landmonster.

Hi Landmonster;

All Ď79-Ď95 mini-truck springs are 60mm or 2.36Ē wide.For more spring dimensions, see the following page, that David Moore has put together, with an excellent collection of stock and lift spring dimensions:

http://www.4x4spot.com/misc__spring_information.htm

        Roger

 

 

Hi Roger,

Found your web site last tonight, thanks for posting the great info! I have a 1993 Toyota pickup 2wd 22RE 5-Speed with 193,000 miles on it.It runs great!

I was wondering if you might please be able to tell me how to slow down the fast idle speed of my engine when the weather is cold.I never checked it with a tachometer, but Iíd say it idles at 2200+ RPM below 40F. Iíd really like to lower that speed and minimize engine wear. When it idles warm itís fine. Itís been doing this since before 101,000 miles when I bought it in 1999.

Also, I will be adjusting my valves again at 200,000 miles and appreciate your posting the how-to and pictures. It helped jog my memory, as itís been 3+ years since Iíve done the job.

Thanks in advance for any help you might offer,

        Paul Patti, Nashua, NH

 

Hi Paul:

There is a detailed write-up on the 22R valve adjustment procedure available on-line at the following web site:

http://www.off-road.com/toyota/tech/22rvalves/index.html

In the interest of brevity, Iíll not summarize the procedure in this monthís Truck Tech column.After doing that, I suggest you test and adjust the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) per the instructions on the page below:

http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTricks/TPS/index.shtml

Again, this was covered in detail in a recent Truck Tech column, so Iíll not repeat that information.Finally, once the TPS idle setting is established, you can set the ignition timing by inserting a jumper wire into the timing check connector and set the timing to 5 BTDC.I have photos of the various locations of the timing check connectors that have been used of the years on my page below:

http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTricks/index.shtml#TimingCheckConnector

Yours should be in the TCCS Diagnostic Connector as shown on the page above.You can then turn down the idle speed using the large screw on top of the throttle body.Note that this all affects the warmed up idle speed, but its best to get that all set properly first.For the cold idle, you can check the various cold idle temperature senders and the air valves that supply added air for faster engine warm-up.As those components and their operation have changed over the years that the 22RE engine has been in service, I would recommend getting a copy of a Factory Service Manual (FSM) and refer to that:

http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/FSM.shtml

        Roger

 

 

Hey Roger;

I have an 85 Toyota 4-runner.Ok, the last couple of weeks my clutch peddle had been getting a lot of free play to the point where I couldnít switch gears, but it goes away after a while back to normal, do I need to adjust the peddle bolt under the dash, or what?

Tell me, ASAP... please.Bryce Perry

Hi Bryce;

There is not much of an adjustment there as far as I know.But you might want to inspect the bracket where the pedal is attached to the firewall.It is not uncommon for the sheet metal it is attached to, to fatigue and crack.If so, repair the damage and it should be good to go.It could also be a leaky clutch master cylinder.If so, you may see a lot of fluid leaking down the pedal.Rebuild or replace the defective master cylinder if needed.If the clutch pedal bracket and master cylinder are both OK, then check the clutch slave cylinder.It is located on the transmission bell housing (passenger side, behind the starter).If the slave cylinder is OK then it might be the throw out fork that may be the problem.You would need to pull the transmission back from the engine to fully inspect and repair that part.

        Roger

 

 

Hi Roger;

I had a question about your turn signal modification on your 4Runner (http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTricks/TurnSignal.shtml).Does it make the light blink any faster than it does stock?I have heard that combing the turn/mark lamps will result in a faster flash (exactly like the fast flash you get when a bulb burns out).

Let me know and thank you in advance, Izeloz Mnemo.

Hi Izeloz;

I have had no problems in 6 years of running this setup; it works just like normal.I made sure to use the same dual-filament turn signal bulb (style 1157) as is used in the rear turn signal, so the relay is seeing the same wattage filaments that it was designed for.I think you can have the type of problems if you make the turn signal relay flash the same filament as the parking lights use, since they are a different wattage.

        Roger

 

 

Note:

If you are searching for, building, modifying, or maintaining a Toyota 4WD mini-truck (Pickup, Hilux, 4Runner, Surf or Tacoma), send your Truck Tech questions to Roger Brown at <TruckEditor@tlca.org>.Iíll try to answer your questions with authority!